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Graphic Novels & Comics

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Graphic Novels & Comics

For people interested in discussing comics in the classroom!

Members: 417
Latest Activity: Dec 28, 2019

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MC POPPERS that are comic artists, writers, webhosters or bloggers...
• Stergios Botzakis blogs at http://graphicnovelresources.blogspot.com
• Jessica Abel is an author, artist and teacher. Her website http://www.jessicaabel.com links you out two her many great graphic novels available at Amazon.
• Marek Bennett author of Nicaragua Travel Journal and creator of the Comics International Ning.
blogs and shares resources at http://comicsworkshop.wordpress.com
• James Bucky Carter author of Building Literacy Connections with Graphic Novels: Page by Page, Panel by Panel blogs at http://ensaneworld.blogspot.com/
Peter Gutierrez blogs on comics and other media at Connect the Pop for School Library Journal

• Jay Hosler, is a biology professor and author/artist whose books on Evolution (The Sandwalk Adventures and Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth) also shares his work-in- progress at his blog http://www.jayhosler.com/jshblog/
• Matt Madden is an author, artist and teacher whose books include 99 Ways to Tell A Story: Exercises in Style and Drawing Words & Writing Pictures (with Jessica Abel). He also blogs at http://mattmadden.blogspot.com
Katie Monnin author of Teaching Graphic Novels blogs at http://teachinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com

• Jim Ottaviani is a librarian and author of many science themed graphic novels through his Ann Arbor based imprint GT Labs.  Heck, Jim is so cool he has a wiki page.
• Hyeondo Park is a manga artist whose work can be found at http://www.hanaroda.net. His illustrations include Wiley adaptations of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar & Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Nick Sousanis is a comic artist whose fascinating philosophical comics about education are collected at http://www.spinweaveandcut.blogspot.com/
• Award-winning artist, illustrator and teacher Gene Yang is the author of many graphic novels including American Born Chinese, The Eternal Smile & Prime Baby. His personal website is http://humblecomics.com. You can also read about his webcomics for Algebra Students here.
• Maureen Bakis has a book about teaching graphic novels coming soon through Corwin and blogs/shares resources at her Ning www.graphicnovelsandhighschoolenglish.com

Comment Wall

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Comment by Jeff Brain on September 17, 2012 at 4:37pm

One of my favorite books to use in teaching comics, that has great "filming" tips is Framed Ink by Marcos Mateu-Mestre.

Comment by Ryan Goble on September 17, 2012 at 4:09pm

Hi Tim! Great question. Unfortunately, things like this - when posted on the wall - tend to get buried / lost. For that reason do consider re-posting the question up above us in the discussion forum as a crowdsource question. That way you have a dedicated URL and I can share your ? on a Crowdsource Tuesday!

Comment by timothy shea on September 17, 2012 at 1:35pm

I will be teaching a college course, "Comics, Graphic Novels and Film" and I would love to know your recommendations, both of books to read and film adaptations to view. Thanks!

Comment by Marek Bennett on August 7, 2012 at 8:05pm

Mike -- This could easily become a full-fledged discussion, but here I'll just put in my standard plug to get the kids drawing with old-fashioned pencil+ink on paper.  Even without the technological apparati, they'll still be learning essential skills relating to visual & hypertextual navigation, prioritization, and project management...

You'll find some sample approaches under HISTORY on my COMICS WORKSHOP blog, including units like WWII, Ancient Maya, Medieval Europe, &c. ...  Note the vital role played by contemporary graphical texts in bringing the historical period to life for the students. -- M

Comment by Mike Mcquade on August 7, 2012 at 5:43pm

Does anyone know of the most user friendly website for students to create comics related to world history? My goal is to give the students a basic historical event summary and then have them draw it online. Something better than paint would be awesome.

Thanks,

Mike

Comment by Marcy Prager on March 26, 2012 at 6:41pm
Comment by Marcy Prager on March 26, 2012 at 6:40pm
Comment by Ryan Goble on March 26, 2012 at 5:34pm

Long Live Stergios! What is the url for your Global Reads BB so people can check it out?

Comment by Marcy Prager on March 26, 2012 at 1:10pm

Thank you so much, Stergios, for adding more titles to the graphic novels' list.  I am now using Pinterest to upload all of the covers of the good graphic novels for teachers to pull of the Graphic Novel bulletin board I created.  There is still a need for more "informative" graphic novels for young students.  So many great titles are geared for middle and upper school kids.  

If anyone wants me to "invite" them to my Global Reads' bulletin board, I will. If you are already a member, just use my name and "follow."  I have a bulletin board of "Global Reads" as well.

Comment by Joan Axthelm on December 29, 2011 at 7:33pm

Steven -

I teach ESL and use xtranormal.com when teaching punctuation, especially commas and complete sentences. First, I make a movie with no punctuation to illustrate how the computer won't pause unless told to do so with punctuation. After that, I show them how it can be done correctly. I have used this for a few years in a row now and have found great success with it. And the students love making the movies and sharing them. I am sure goanimate will work similarily.

I have also used graphic novels to teach dialog punctuation (many other languages don't use quotation marks - Spanish, for example, only uses paragraph changes to notate dialog). I ask students to re-tell a part of a graphic novel using traditional text. It forces them to use inference to decide on feelings and verbs to describe actions. It also forces them to use dialog punctuation whenever there is a dialog or thought bubble. And when they get to writing their own stories, it is really easy to hark back to "would that be in a dialog bubble?" when thinking when to use dialog punctuation.

I think your idea of using goanimate will be great! Best of luck!

 

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